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dc.contributor.advisorBaude, Francoise
dc.coverage.spatialNiza
dc.creatorRuz-Ruz, Cristian
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-28T17:30:17Z
dc.date.available2017-03-28T17:30:17Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifierhttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/cl/
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10533/180089
dc.description.abstractIn recent years, software applications have evolved from monolithic, stable, centralized and structured applications, to highly decentralized, distributed and dynamic software. This evolution has naturally enforced a change in the development process of such software. The practice of building in-house software for specific purposes, turned to the development of small pieces of encapsulated code implementing specific tasks that can be reused in different applications, that were known as "off-the-shelf" components. Moreover, these software components, that gave base to the concept of component-based software development, could be independently developed and provided by third parties, decentralizing, at least partly, the development process. This practice reduced the necessity of rewriting commonly used tasks, helped to cope with changing requirements, and focused in an intelligent separation oftasks that are delegated to software components, that are glued together to create the new application [DNGM+os]. However, in that situation, the ownership and the management ofthe application are still in the hands ofthe entity that develops the application. The next step carne when the focus turned to the provision of a functionality instead of just a piece of software, and this functionality begun to be provided "as a service". In this situation, independent providers offer a set of functionalities in the form of services that can be accessed and used in a standard way, facilitating the aggregation of such services to create new service compositions with added value, better suited to their current needs. Such applications are referred toas service-based applications. The service-based approach to software development has, undoubtedly, many advantages. Code reutilisation, outsourcing, and modularity provide a more rapid development process. The possibility of having third parties providing functionalities that can be accessed in a standard way has given rise to an ever-growing number of loosely-coupled geographically dispersed services available on the Internet, that has naturally taken the role of being the delivery means for such services. Composition standards have been developed to facilitate the creation of aggregated services giving rise to a rapidly evolving service ecosystem. Such dynamism has also been a response to evolving requirements in software development. In fact, the software development process used to considera "closed-world" assumption in which the externa! world changes so slowly that software can remain stable for a long period before any major update needs to applied. However, each time more and more situations arise where this assumption is not anymore valid and software applications must face an "open-world" in which the environment changes continuously and applications need to adapt and react to changes in a dynamic way, even if those changes are unanticipated [BDNG06]. However such dynamicity, loosely-coupling and heterogeneity of providers has introduced not trivial challenges in the management of service-based applications. As the maintenance of the software does not depend completely on the provider of a service composition, due to the fact that sorne pieces of them may be under the control of third parties, sorne characteristics that are usually manageable in controlled environments, like availability, response time, security, and others related to the quality of the delivered service, are not always ensured. Even if the provider is able to manage all the services in a composition, environmental factors like network latency, congestion, and hardware failures may affect the service in unforeseen ways. Traditional optimization cycles where the application is stopped, analyzed, modified and restarted does not fit well in a situation where not all the services are under the control of a single entity, and where there is a need to timely react to requirements and environmental changes, automating the analysis and decision taking phases as much as possible, and with a minimal perturbation in the availability of these services.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relationinstname: Conicyt
dc.relationreponame: Repositorio Digital RI2.0
dc.relationinstname: Conicyt
dc.relationreponame: Repositorio Digital RI2.0
dc.rightsAtribución-NoComercial-SinDerivadas 3.0 Chile
dc.titleAutonomic monitoring and management of component-based services
dc.typeTesis Doctorado
dc.description.degreeDoctor en Ciencias Mención Informática
dc.contributor.institutionUniversité de Nice
dc.description.statusTERMINADA
dc.country.isofra
dc.description.conicytprogramPFCHA-Becas
dc.description.pages170p.
dc.relation.projectidinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/PFCHA-Becas/RI20
dc.relation.setinfo:eu-repo/semantics/dataset/hdl.handle.net/10533/93488
dc.rights.driverinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.type.driverinfo:eu-repo/semantics/doctoralThesis
dc.date.start2011
dc.relation.programhandle/10533/108040
dc.description.shortconicytprogramPFCHA-Becas
dc.type.tesisTesis
dc.type.openaireinfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion


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