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dc.coverage.spatialWashington
dc.creatorNational Academy of Science
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-06T16:10:30Z
dc.date.available2017-10-06T16:10:30Z
dc.date.issued1977
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10533/206649
dc.description.abstractIt is fitting that the Committee make explicit the premises on which it proceeded and the boundaries it adopted to render its task manageable . First, the Comrnittee accepted the defmition of remote sensing as applying primarily to the collection of data concerning the earth's surface from a satellite. It noted, wherever appropriate , the continuing importance of ground and aerial observation, but put the emphasis on the gains and new opportunities made possible by multispectral sensing from a platform in space . Second, the Comrnittee took as its point of departure the present LANDSAT system-a given whose cost had already been justified on grounds of U.S. domestic interest and whose further development and refmement as an innovative technology could be counted on as highly probable. Third, in relating the technology to the resource information needs of developing countries, the Committee focused on those aspects which in the aggregate formed a broad common denominator. It did not attempt to tackle the larger and more complex question of developing country practices and capabilities in resource management. These, for the hundred or so nations that constitute the developing world, cover such a wide spectrum as to defy categorization or generalization. Fourth, the Committee discussed several financia! questions but eschewed any quantified valuatio~ of the technology and its applications. Cost-benefit analysis is an uncertain art; its findings do not travel well. Cost-effectiveness figures may be more revealing, but as a rule are too particular to the specific problem, techniques, time, and place to which they apply to be cited for useful instruction. The calculation ofbenefit can be determined only by each country in relation to its particular designs and circumstances, and to its intangible gains with respect to science education, indigenous research, and regional cooperation. Fifth, the Committee felt that the matter of resource sensing from space could not usefully be examined in isolation from the important political problems it raises and which may significantly condition its future.
dc.titleResource Sensing from Space: Prospects for Developing Countries
dc.typeLibro
dc.country.isousa
dc.description.pages210
dc.subject.materiaCooperación
dc.type.monografiaMonografía


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